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Fine & Thinning Hair

What is HAIR THINNING?

If you have fine or thin hair, you know firsthand what it’s like to experience excessive shedding, breakage and thinning. What you may not understand is why your hair is more prone to shedding than others. At times you may feel hopeless to retain or manage thin hair, and noticeable thinning can lead to emotional distress and diminished confidence. To treat, style and retain thin hair requires understanding the physiology and anatomy of your hair. Fine hair means that the hair shaft has a small diameter that is more susceptible to breaking strands and causing hair fall. However, not all fine hair is thin, and not all thin hair is fine. Allow us to elaborate. 

WHAT CAUSES THINNING HAIR?

We are each given 23 unique chromosomes that have passed down through generations. It is this genetic, ancestral cycle that makes us individually, uncompromisingly unique. In other words, our genetics play a significant role in our body’s essential functions, biochemistry, and appearance. If you have thin or fine hair, you likely inherited it from one of your parents. It’s easy to lump thin and fine hair into one category, but they are two individual and complex entities.

Thin Hair
We are each given 23 unique chromosomes that have passed down through generations. It is this genetic, ancestral cycle that makes us individually, uncompromisingly unique. In other words, our genetics play a significant role in our body’s essential functions, biochemistry, and appearance. If you have thin or fine hair, you likely inherited it from one of your parents. It’s easy to lump thin and fine hair into one category, but they are two individual and complex entities.

Fine Hair
Unlike the scattered positioning of thin hair across the scalp, fine hair means that each individual strand is especially thin. These delicate strands are a result of hair shafts that have a small diameter, and are more prone to breakage and thinning.

Types of Fine & thin Hair

Now that we’ve asserted that fine and thin hair are two different things—can you have both? Yes, and that’s not the only combination. It’s possible and reasonable for women to have:

Fine, thin hair

Some hair loss conditions are both genetic and medical, such as Alopecia Areata. This immune system disorder causes hair to fall in patches the size of a quarter. However, it’s also genetic as 1-in-5 people with Alopecia Areata have a relative who also has the condition.

Low density (thin) yet coarse hair

Scattered hair follicles across the scalp, yet individual hair strands are coarse.

Dense, thin hair

Evenly and densely packed follicles with fine hair strands

With these dynamic combinations in play, it’s a wonder the terms “fine,” and “thin” are considered interchangeable. There is no shortage of misconceptions about thinning hair, but with an intimate understanding of your hair, you gain the power to better treat and manage it.

SIGNS & SYMPTOMS OF THINNING HAIR

The most apparent sign of thin or fine hair is excessive shedding as you brush or wash your hair. In addition, hair may lack body, bounce, and volume, and shed throughout the day. When you style your hair, it may easily lose its body and have trouble holding the style.

HAIR THINNING DIAGNOSIS

Fine or thin hair is not a medical condition, but it can occur as a result of an underlying issue or disease. With 40% of American women suffering from hair thinning, shedding and hair loss, diagnosis requires a broad inspection into a woman’s medical history, genetics, nutrition and lifestyle.

If you have always had fine or thin hair, it’s unlikely that the cause is related to anything other than genetics, which makes managing your hair easier once you have the right tools and solutions in hand.

HOW TO PREVENT HAIR THINNING

To prevent losing fragile strands requires daily awareness and intervention into how you manage and handle your hair. The bottom line is that thin and fine hair requires greater finesse so that you don’t break or shed precious strands. To do this, it’s critical to assess your beauty and habitual routines that can either make or break fine or thin hair.

HAIR THINNING TREATMENT

There are abundant solutions to help you retain your lovely locks. While you may at times throw up your hands in frustration, these tools will help you maximize hair health, boost self-confidence, and perhaps even catch yourself doing a double-take in the mirror.

Here’s what you can do to manage fine or thin hair:

Ditch tight hairstyle
Ponytails, top buns, and braids tug at hair follicles, adding pressure and tension that results in breakage. Instead, wear loose hairstyles and tie hair back with soft scrunchies or hair ties.

Dry with a soft towel
Instead of wrapping hair up tightly with an abrasive towel, use a soft, microfiber towel to gently pat hair. Squeeze wet hair with the microfiber towel to absorb water verses rubbing which can rough up delicate hair.

Allow hair to completely hair dry
After you’ve washed, rinsed, and patted your hair dry with a soft towel, let your hair naturally air dry instead of using abrasive heat from blow dryers.

Brush with a wide-tooth comb
Routine brushing helps detangle stringy, fine hair. However, hair brushing tugs at your follicles and can lead to more shedding and hair loss. A wide-tooth comb enables you to gently detangle without pulling hairs out. Start at the end of your strands and slowly work your way up to the scalp.

Swap the cotton for silk
Cotton might feel oh-so-soft, but have you tried silk? Fibers from commercial materials like cotton and polyester can snag hair strands as you sleep. Silk is ultra-smooth and reduces friction that pulls at hair strands. Plus—it’s heavenly!